#SWD Challenge APR18

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Non Academic staff balance by gender

Interactive viz:
UKHE non academic staff split by gender

Description:

For April’s #SWDchallenge , Cole Knaflic challenged the community to create a SQUARE AREA GRAPH or WAFFLE CHART in its more common branding.

What did I do?

I decided to present the gender balances between staff categories in non academic roles in UK Higher Education.

Staff categories are defined by the standard occupational classification coding (SOC2010)

Major groups

  • 1 Managers, directors and senior officials
  • 2 Professional occupations
  • 3 Associate professional and technical occupations
  • 4 Administrative and secretarial occupations
  • 5 Skilled trades occupations
  • 6 Caring, leisure and other service occupations
  • 7 Sales and customer service occupations
  • 8 Process, plant and machine operatives
  • 9 Elementary occupation

Takeaway:

The overall proportional split of non-academic staff by gender is 63/37, two staff categories [administrative and secretarial occupations and sales and customer service occupations] are distributed above this overall gender split (due to the volume underpinning of administrative and secretarial occupations), FEMALES are most under-represented in the skilled trades and process, plant and machine operative type occupations.

Blog:

April’s challenge

Source of dataviz: 

Figure 5 – All staff (excluding atypical) by equality characteristics 2016/17

Tag:

#datathatinterestsme

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TOP10 Wine Producing Countries

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TOP10 Wine Producing Countries

Interactive viz:

TOP10 WINE producing Countries

Description:

#Makeovermonday dataset wk 14 2018 – A delightfully simple dataset this week.

  • Country
  • Year
  • Volume of production in Million hectolitres (mhl)

Takeaway:

  • ITALY #1, minor blip in 2014, but predicted and forecast to recover the crown of #1 wine producing country in the world.
  • Italy, France and Spain, consistently the TOP3 wine producing countries over this time period

Source:

International organisation of vine and wine

Tag:

#Makeovermonday

UK Labour Market Demand

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Three simple vizzes for three simple questions:

1. What are the most in demand industries in the UK?

2. Which industries are in more demand in what regions?

3. How does the demand in each region compare to the UK demand for each industry?

UK Labour market demand_industry

Interactive viz:
I haven’t published this viz as there is limited interactivity or added value from hosting this on Tableau Public, so a clean image (generated in Tableau) is more than appropriate to present the headline #coffeetable viz insight.

Q1|viz1 Description:

A humble bar chart listing the most to least in demand industries across the UK. I highlight the TOP5 in demand industries by standard industry coding (SIC), presenting the absolute volume of jobs and proportion each industry accounts for in the UK (2016).

Takeaway:

5 industries account for more than 50% of the UK labour market

TOP5

  1. Wholesale and retail trade; repair of vehicles
  2. Human health and social care activities
  3. Administrative and support service activities
  4. Professional, scientific and technical activities
  5. Education

Intrigued by the proportional demand of some industries over others I thought it would be interesting understand if there was regionalism to the industrial demand.

Q2. Which industries are in more demand in what regions?

UK Labour market demand_industry_regional comparison

Interactive viz:
UK Labour market demand_regional proportions

Q2|viz2 Description:

Select an industry and you are presented with a visual of which regions are in most demand for a given industry. A bar chart provides the detail of the proportional split, hover over the bar for the volume detail, and heat map of the uk provides an easy takeaway of workforce concentration. The rational for this visualisation is to inform which industry sectors are more in demand in which regions

Takeaway:

  • Wholesale and retail trade; repair of vehicles
    • Largest regional proportional weightings for this industry sector are Northern Ireland and East Midlands
    • 8/12 region have a higher than UK average industry proportion
  • Human health and social care activities
    • Largest regional proportional weighting for this industry sector is Wales
    • 8/12 region have a higher than UK average industry proportion
  • Administrative and support service activities
    • Largest regional proportional weighting for this industry sector is London
    • 4/12 regions have a higher than UK average industry proportion
  • Professional, scientific and technical activities
    • Largest regional proportional weighting for this industry sector is London
    • 4/12 regions have a higher than UK average industry proportion
  • Education
    • Largest regional proportional weighting for this industry sector is South east
    • 9/12 regions have a higher than UK average industry proportion

Having being intrigued by delving into the subject industry by industry, I felt it useful to take a look from a region by region perspective que Q3…

Q3. How does the demand in each region compare to the UK demand for each industry?

UK Labour market demand_regional comparison

Interactive viz:
UK Labour market demand_regional comparison

Q3|Viz3 Description:

In this viz you select a particular region, the visualisation presents the proportional distribution of the labour market in that region (highest to lowest), you can hover over the bar lines to view the absolute volume of demand for each industry. a benchmark line denotes the UK sector average distribution and the colour of the bar (blue or grey) highlight where a region is above (blue) or below (grey) the UK average. The right hand side of the viz simply presents the difference in percentage point distribution of the industry per region against the UK sector. The rational for this is to display where a particular industry is more in demand at a regional level than nationally.

Takeaway:

Wholesale retail Trade; Repair of vehicles dominates the regional labour market demand in terms of proportional distribution of the workforce, however interesting stories emerge in taking a look at which industries deviate most from the UK sector distribution, highlighting regions additional industry focuses.

  • East Midlands
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (15.7%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in C – Manufacturing (12.1%) +4.4pp
  • East of England
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (15.6%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is Administrative support services (10.4%) +1.5pp
  • London
    • The most in demand industry is M – Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (14.4%), This industry also has the largest deviation from the sector av +5.7pp
  • North east
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is Human Health and Social Work Activities (14.9%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in C – Manufacturing (10.5%) +2.9pp
  • North West
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (14.6%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in C – Manufacturing (9.3%) +1.7pp
  • Northern Ireland
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (15.7%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in C – Manufacturing (10.9%) +3.3pp
  • Scotland
    • The most in demand industry is Human Health and Social Work Activities (14.2%), This industry also has the largest deviation from the sector av +1.8pp
  • South East
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (14.4%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in J – Information and Computing (5.9%) +1.8pp
  • South West
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (14.4%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in A – Agriculture Forestry and Fishing (2.7%) +1.4pp
  • Wales
    • The most in demand industry is Human Health and Social Work Activities (17.2%), This industry also has the largest deviation from the sector av +4.8pp
  • West Midlands
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (15.4%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in C – Manufacturing (10.4%) +2.8pp
  • Yorkshire and the Humber
    • Whilst the most in demand industry is G – Wholesale retail Trade; repair of vehicles (15.5%), the largest positive deviation from the sector av is in C – Manufacturing (9.4%) +1.8pp

Data Source:

ONS

Tag:

#datathatinterestsme

 

#SWD Challenge MAR18 – The man who broke the 4 minute MILE barrier

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Under the 4 min MILE

Interactive viz:
Roger Bannister | The man that broke the 4 min MILE barrier

Description:

For March Cole challenged the community in her #SWDchallenge project to a viz celebrating the humble BAR CHART.

What did I do?

Following the news of the passing of legend Sir Roger Bannister (3rd March 2018), I thought I would combine  and the #SWDchallenge with a topical viz showcasing the magnificent men that have since held the record of fastest man for the MILE distance.

The United Kingdom’s Sir Roger Bannister only held the record (03:59:400) for a matter of weeks, 6th May 1954 – 21st June 1954 when Australian John Landy set the new time of  03:58:000. Since the 4 minute barrier was smashed, 18 records and 13 men have improved on that 03:59 marker. The record is currently held by Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco, with a staggering time of 03:43:130, some 16 seconds quicker than Bannister’s, and this time hasn’t been beaten since 1999.

The questions is; Can man run any quicker than this, or have we reached the physical limit of what the human body can do? Only time will tell! One thing is for sure, Sir Roger Bannister will always be the first athlete to go under the 4 minute barrier.

RIP

Blog:

Cole’s fabulous monthly write up

#SWD Challenge blog

Source of dataviz: 

Wikipedia

Tag:

#datathatinterestsme

#SWD Challenge FEB18 – Education

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% change in student accepts to UK HE_tdsktpREVISED

Interactive viz:
% Change in UCAS accepts

Description:

For February Cole challenged the community in her #SWDchallenge project to a viz centred on education.

What did I do?

February’s challenge centred on education, raising awareness for Black History Month, for this I have focused on undergraduate UK UCAS acceptances to UK higher education. This chart depicts the percentage change in acceptances to UK HE between 2006-2017 by gender and ethnic group. I annotate a few key points in time to add some context to the changes over time, add a takeaway to add to the descriptive title.

Blog:

For this Feb challenge #VisualisingHE knocked up a group post to celebrate the Educational theme

#SWD Challenge | Feb18 | Education

Cole’s fabulous monthly write up includes this viz and other the other submissions:

#SWD Challenge blog | Feb18

Source of dataviz: 

UCAS End of Cycle

Tag:

#VisualisingHE

HESA Statistical First Return (SFR) 2016/7

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HESA_SFR_Fig1

Interactive viz:
HESA_SFR20167_Fig1

Description:

Cheeky little viz to kick off our latest #VisualisingHE post on the recently published HESA statistical First Return 2016/7 published Jan 2018.

Takeaway:

  • Marginal increases in First degree compared to previous year – 2015/6
  • Marginal declines in post graduate research compared to previous year – 2015/6
  • Most growth shown in the Postgraduate Taught Market shown in 2016/7 compared to 2015/6
  • Other Undergraduate population also took a hit falling by 8% on previous years populations

 

Blog:

Students in HE – the interesting bits

Source: 

HESA SFR 2016/7

Tag:

#VisualisingHE

UCAS End of Cycle 2017 – Applications and Accepts

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Bump Applications or Accepts

Interactive viz:
UCAS Applications and Accepts

Description:

Bump chart showing rank in volume of applications or accepts to UK Higher Education per subject area between 2007 and 2017, interactivity to switch between Applications or Accepts and filter between country group (UK, Other EU or Non UK).

This viz is a rework of an original #VisualisingHE viz by fellow contributor @daveedkirk, but i took the opportunity to enrich the data source with another of the end of cycle sources allowing for a little more interactivity to the viz (apps and accepts), plus i have added the additional functionality of filtering by country group to highlight the differing subject demands and preferences by country group over time.

Takeaway:

  • Subjects Allied to Medicine solidly holding top spot since 2010 for the volume of applications
    • UK domiciled students driving this No.1 slot overall, but No.1 ranked subject area for Non EU and Other EU domiciled student continues to be Business and Admin studies.
  • Business and Admin Studies maintaining a No.1 spot for volume of accepts for the period 2007-2017

 

Blog:

not yet updated UCAS end of cycle #VisualisingHE – on its way

Source: 

UCAS end of Cycle 2017

Tag:

#VisualisingHE